How do you teach beginning readers?


kid reading Teach Magically Teaching beginning readers

Teaching Beginning Readers

Research has proven that students who enter kindergarten not knowing their letters are at risk. So if they learn their letters easily, the risk can be diminished. 

Jan Richardson collected data on students who enter kindergarten knowing less than 40 letters and concluded that two instructional procedures have quickly taught letter names, letter sounds, and many concepts of print to students that did not know above 40 letters. They were daily letter tracing practice and small group guided reading guided reading.
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER
pin Teach Magically teaching beginning readers
She recommends that a helper works with a student each day to tracing an ABC book. The ABC book is designed to teach letter names (upper and lower case). 
She recommends that students say the name of the letter twice as they trace the letter in the ABC book because students with very limited letter knowledge are likely to become overwhelmed if asked to learn the letter name and letter sound at the same time (Lipson & Wixson, 2010, Successful Approaches to RTI ). 


So add the sounds later.

How do you teach letters and sounds?


I have found that using arrows and starting dot point to help kiddos trace has made all the difference.
Teach Magically Helping Beginning Readers B Bus Picture
If students know the name of the letter it will be easier for them to remember the sound of the letter since the sound for the letter is often embedded in the name of the letter  (Lipson & Wixson, 2010, Successful Approaches to RTI, p. 42).


HOW TO DO IT

Sitting next to the student, have them trace each upper and lowercase letter with their finger and identify the picture while saying the names (i.e. “A, a, apple. B, b, ball.”). It’s important for the student to use their pointer finger (not a pencil or marker) and trace from top to bottom because “the tactile experience is essential for building a memory trace,” says Richardson. 

If the student needs help tracing, only help with the letters that are necessary with the hand-over-hand method. 
Teach Magically Hand over Hand Helping Beginning Readers
If they can identify 10-40 letters, they will trace the whole book daily.
ADAPT-If a student knows less than 10 letters, just have them trace the letters in their name.

other fun things I do to Help

Other fun ways to work with other phonological awareness skills. Here are a few ideas:
These activities integrate a variety of skills including early print concepts (Click here for free concepts of print handout)phonemic awareness, phonics, visual memory, visual scanning, letter formation, directionality, and using picture clues; students learn that reading makes sense. 

Catching readers early means we can close the achievement gap and prevent many of them from experiencing difficulty learning to read. 

Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas to help children magically learn; plus it save you time. Please connect  on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.
Make everyday magical,

💖Debora from Teach Magically


Phonological Awareness or Phonemic Awareness


"They know most letters and sounds, but are they ready to read?" is a question asked by many parents and teachers of beginning readers. The answer...
Maybe, not!
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER

The skills for phonological awareness skills must be mastered before the complex skill of reading can be achieved.

What is Phonological Awareness?

The ability to hear sounds that make up words in spoken language. It is the big umbrella for all the skills needed to read and write. Language can be broken down into its components:
Teach Magically umbrella of phonological awareness skills
  • sentences to words 
  • words to syllables
  • syllables to onset-rime 
  • onset-rime to phonemes

Phonological Awareness provides a strong foundation for early reading success. A systematic and cohesive approach to teaching phonological awareness can build confident readers who are less likely to struggle with decoding and spelling skills.Students with a strong phonemic awareness are much more likely to be successful readers.

This includes recognizing words that rhyme, deciding whether words begin or end with the same sounds, understanding that sounds can be manipulated to create new words, and separating words into their individual sounds.

Check out my page with many ideas to teach these skills!

To build a strong reading success, children need to master Phonological Awareness Skills, especially phonemic awareness! 

What is Phonemic Awareness?

Phonemic awareness is a subset of phonological awareness in which listeners are able to hear, identify and manipulate phonemes, the smallest units of sound that can differentiate meaning.
Separating the spoken word "cat" into three distinct phonemes, /k/, /a/, and /t/, requires phonemic awareness. So jump as you say each sound to make it more fun!
Research shows that the ability to segment or separate words into parts is the biggest predictor of reading success!(Stanovich, 1993).
Teach Magically Phonological Awareness segmenting
I use these  No Prep Sound (phoneme) Worksheets with BINGO dabbers...touch one square for each sound! Writing the letters for the sounds at the bottom builds phonics skills into this fun activity.
Remember Phonemic Awareness only uses the sounds! Check out how they are related at Phonemic Awareness, Rhyming and Phonics

Phonemic Awareness Worksheet TeachMagically
Of course, but be sure to attach the letter names after the students understand letter names! For students with difficulties learning, add the phonics at the next lesson.

Don't forget to practice phonological awareness skills! Students with a strong phonemic awareness are much more likely to be successful readers. Phonological and Phonemic Awareness provides a strong foundation for early reading success. A systematic and cohesive approach to teaching phonological awareness can build confident readers who are less likely to struggle with decoding and spelling skills.

Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas to help children magically learn; plus it save you time. Please connect  on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.
Make everyday magical,
💖Debora from Teach Magically

Reading Sight Words!

Kids reading Sight Word Books

Ever have a difficult time trying to get some students to read sight words, or words that can not be stretched and need to learned by memory or sight.
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER
TeachMagically Blog post about Sight Words

Many Activities for Sight Word Recognition

  • Drill Sandwiches- A perfect way to practice all new learning. You sandwich new words between known words and practice until fluent. 
Sight Words Stamped in red play-dough from Teach Magically
Word Finds from Teach Magically for sight words




And all of these things are fine to practice but in the actual teaching what can you do to help the students with these difficult words? After working with a research based intervention system and observing the students just beginning to learn to read words, I think I have come across a way to help the brain learn these words!

I hope it helps you when you are teaching!

If students make an error with one of these irregular words (words you can not say the sounds and blend them back to get a word).

1st-Tell them the word and have them repeat the word.
2nd-Have them spell the word aloud and tell the word they spelled.
3rd-Return to the word a second time and have the child try to read the word by spelling it in their head.

I created an instruction sheet to share with parents plus I use it with the students for progress monitoring and goal setting! Click on picture to get document!
Family letter to teach sight words from Teach Magically
Click to get Free Family Letter.

I am going to do this activity first with every "sight word" we are trying to learn that can not be stretched (sounded out) that is not on our rhyming word wall.

I use rhyming posters at the beginning of the year for rhyming word id. Check out how I teach words with rhymes to help with writing👉 Rhyming Posters to Teach Sight Words.

I am also going to start having my students do this as they are reading. When those mistakes are made we have many ways to try and solve them! Click here to see Emergent Readers.
Kids reading sight word books from Teach Magically


You can find a great resource to helps students learn by clicking the picture below! The students love to practice these words because of the fun dinos! The lightning clue helps the kiddo spell or sound out the words!
Dinosaur Sight Words Practice Teach Magically
Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas to help children magically learn; plus it save you time!


Please connect  on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.


Make everyday magical,
❤Debora from Teach Magically

What are Fine Motor Skills?

You hear all these strange words of fine motor and gross motor along with how they are so important....BUT what are fine motor skills do you wonder? Check out gross motor here but read below to check out fine motor ideas.
(This post may contain affiliate links which means I make a small commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support!)
According to Understood.org:
"We use fine motor skills to make small movements. These movements come so naturally to most people that we usually don’t think about them. Fine motor skills are complex, however. They involve the coordinated efforts of the brain and muscles, and they’re built on the gross motor skills that allow us to make bigger movements."


Children benefit from experiences that support the development of fine motor skills in the hands and fingers. Children should have strength and dexterity in their hands and fingers before being asked to manipulate a pencil on paper but we start writing right away in kindergarten or even in preschool so many children miss the development that is so important because we push them to write...but we can still work on these skills!
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER
Child holding Claw Pencil Grip

What are some Fine Motor Skills to develop?

ücutting with scissors-Free Cutting Reminder Page
üpushing and pulling building blocks Like Llego and Brickyard
ümanipulating play dough
üholding and maneuvering a pencil
ügetting dressed with zippers, buttons, and snaps
üusing silverware while eating
üopening and closing latches

Working on dexterity and strength first can eliminate the development of an inappropriate pencil grasp, which is becoming more commonplace as young children are engaged in writing experiences before their hands are ready so we work fine motor skills with kindergarten curriculum and call it fun! 


Different way to work and develop fine motor skills.


1. Play with Play-dough
Encourage children to squeeze, stretch, pinch and roll “snakes” or “worms” with the play-dough to spell words and create letters. You can even have children cut the play-dough with scissors. We like to make pancakes and stamp sight words from our rhyming posters.
Playdough words from Teach Magically


2. Tear Paper for Crafts
Paper tearing is an excellent way to develop fine motor skills.  The student needs to focus on using the thumb and pointer fingers to make "small" tears in construction paper. See ways to Teach Paper Tearing.
Pictures of Paper Tearing Teach Magically

3. Painting with Qtips
Different types of painting can help strengthen hand-eye coordination and manual dexterity. Finger painting gives kiddos an opportunity to use their hands...and to get messy. Painting with a q-tip helps kids learn to hold with a pincer grip. Encourage 3 fingered grasp of the pencil. Read how to create these Bumble Bees.
Qtips Painting Teach Magically

4. Cut with Scissors
Use scissors to cut simple shapes, Remember straight lines are easier. Curved lines are more difficult. I try to have the students cut shapes to help retell stories and poems. Check out Humpty Dumpty. Click to get Cutting Guide for reinforcement.

5. Copy Simple Shapes
Making triangle shapes can be difficult because of the diagonal lines. Once simple shapes can be made, pictures can then been seen. Drawing "myself" or mom is a perfect activity because "people" drawing includes many different shapes. Encourage 3 fingered grasp of the pencil. Then write and label the story! Rhyming Posters helps with writing of young readers or friends that have difficulty remembering how to spell.


6. Coloring within Lines
Teach how to slow down when close to the line. Sometimes help is needed to focus on the paper and the lines. Use the fingers for the movement of the crayon or pencils. Encourage 3 fingered grasp with this fun Bubblegum Game to learn letters and sounds.
Child Holding Highlighter with Pencil Grip Teach Magically

7. Paste and Glue
Using the glue and placing shapes in relation to each other to make pictures. We cut out rectangles to sequence Humpty Dumpty and retell the nursery Rhyme to practice working our auditory memory skills. Read other Humpty Dumpty Activities.
Child Pasting Fine Motor Skill Teach Magically

8. Connecting Building Blocks
Putting these blocks together and taking them apart works the finger muscles. The small blocks should be used as soon as the child stops putting things in their mouths. The Brickyard brand has an alligator that helps remove the blocks that is another perfect fine motor workout!
Kid building with connecting blocks Teach Magically


Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas to help children learn.

Please connect  on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.

Make everyday magical,
❤Debora from Teach Magically

5 Goal Setting Read Alouds

goal setting read  aloud Teach Magically
Reading and talking about goals is an important skill that need to be developed for students. I try to read and discuss many read goal setting picture books to encourage students to work hard to achieve goals. Here are a few of the books that love to share with the students, but you can also see them here in video form.

(This post may contain affiliate links which means I make a small commission if you make a purchase, at no additional cost to you. Thank you for your support!)
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER
These videos from YouTube are great stories to use to discuss goal setting along with hopes and dreams for a growth mindset. I then put the books in my classroom library for all to share.

Great Goal Setting Picture Books

Giraffes Can't Dance-Gerald the giraffe’s long legs are too skinny and his neck is too long so he has difficulty dancing. "Giraffes can't dance," jest the animals when it's Gerald's turn to prance while the warthogs waltz, the chimps cha-cha, and the lions tango. Gerald starts swaying to his own sweet tune after receiving sound advice from the cricket.

Bear's Bargain-Frank Asch uses his simple, bright illustrative style to bring to life this charming tale where Bear wishes he could fly like Little Bird, while Little Bird longs to be big and strong like Bear. The two friends find creative ways to make each other’s dreams come true.

 A Chair for My Mother (start at 2:08)-Rosa, her mother and grandmother save their coins to buy a comfortable chair for all to enjoy after their home is destroyed by a fire. This tender story about family and perseverance is an excellent selection for practicing the comprehension strategies of visualizing, retelling, and identifying the author’s purpose. 

Amazing Grace-This inspiring picture book brings to life the story about an optimistic girl named Grace that tries out for the role of Peter Pan even after she becomes discourage by her classmates. The message to follow you dreams no matter what other say are beautifully depicted.

Miss Rumphius-Inspired by a true-life story, Miss Rumphius longed to travel the world, live in a house by the sea, and do something to make the world more beautiful. This story tells about living for your hearts’ desires and giving something back to the world.

Here are some goal setting resources:

Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas.

Please connect  on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.

Make everyday magical,
❤Debora from Teach Magically