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Snowmen Segmenting and Successive Blending

noprep segmenting  and successive blending from teachmagically

For children to understand what they read, they must be able to read words rapidly and accurately. Rapid and accurate word reading frees children to focus their attention on the meaning of what they read but it doesn't happen without practice so we use cute no prep snowmen to practice this difficult skill. We had so much fun segmenting snowmen that showed us pictures on their bellies with special snowball Elkonin Boxes!  We used snowballs (cotton balls) to segment and search for sounds.
      noprep segmenting  and successive blending from teachmagically
Say the first sound as you move a cotton ball onto the first snowman.
noprep segmenting  and successive blending from teachmagically
Say the second sound and move the snowball.
noprep segmenting  and successive blending from teachmagically
Say the last sound and move the final snowball!
Then we went back and wrote the letters that stand for the sounds!
noprep segmenting  and successive blending from teachmagically
We practiced reading the sounds and saying the word! Then use successive blending to read the words. 

Why successive blending?

Successive blending is less demanding on working memory and helps students blend words accurately.

It is difficult for many beginning readers to make the connection between a seemingly random string of phonemes (sounds) and an actual word.  Because these sounds initially appear random, reproducing the sounds in sequence taxes working, short term, memory.
When decoding and unknown word like“hit”, students might be able to identify the individual sounds as /h/…/i/…/t/.  However, because they see these sounds as random, students are relying completely on his working memory to recall the sounds in sequence.  As a result, mistakes are made in various ways. For example, hit could be read as (it), sounds are left out, additional sounds are added (hist), or sounds could be out of sequence sequence (tip).

What is successive blending?

Successive Blending is an instructional technique that provides a scaffold for students who are unable to sequence more than two sounds or have working memory issues. For example, a student who would benefit from successive blending might read the word “hit” as “hip”, “ip”, or “top”, among other possibilities.  This suggests that the student is unable to remember all three sounds in order.
When using successive blending, children say the first two sounds in a word and immediately blend those two sounds together.  Then, they say the third sound and immediately blend that sound with the first two blended sounds.  Successive blending is less taxing on short term memory.
The following are the steps for reading the word “hit” using successive blending:
  • The reader looks at the first letter and says /h/.
  • The reader looks at the next letter and says /i/.
  • The reader blends the first two sounds together and says /hi/
  • The reader repeats /hi/, looks at the last letter and says /t/
  • The reader blends /hi/ and /t/ together to make “hit”
Each page had a specific short vowel sound!  Next, we will work on mixed vowels to help us solidly understand all the parts of a word!
Here is the resource
noprep segmenting  and successive blending from teachmagically
Other products to help segment and successive blending!
free segmenting  and successive blending snowmen from teachmagically segmenting  and successive blending phonemic awareness puzzles from teachmagically segmenting  and successive blending snowmen bundle from teachmagically 

Make sure to go check out my store, Debora Marines TeachMagically for more resources for  learners and you can follow Debora Marines TeachMagically for new products, discounts, updates, and freebies. Here’s where you can find me:Teachers Pay TeachersFacebookInstagram, or Pinterest
Debora

Segmenting Snowmen Fun

It is winter and time for segmenting, snow, and snowmen! 

Segmenting Blog Post TeachMagically
Yeah, anything with a snow theme is fun!
Since segmenting is such an important skill in Phonological Awareness, we used snowmen cards and pictures to match the snowflake letters to the picture on the snowman's belly. You can see the way all students stay involved at Snowmen Segmenting with Phonics. There is a free resource there, too! The picture will take you to the bundle.

segmenting snowmen teachmagically
Snowman Bundle
We also used cotton balls to segment the sounds with movement and then wrote the words on a snowball. You can find out exactly how at Snowmen Segmenting.
This Easy Segmenting Activity is so much fun for students and it actually helps learners look through words which improves reading skills.


Make sure to go check out my store, Debora Marines TeachMagically for more resources for  learners and you can follow Debora Marines TeachMagically for new products, discounts, updates, and freebies. Here’s where you can find me:Teachers Pay TeachersFacebookInstagram, or Pinterest
                           
                       
   Debora 

Do You Need Free Teaching Resources?

The holidays are a really busy time for everyone…ESPECIALLY teachers! Check out some great FREE TEACHING CHRISTMAS Resources. Click the photo of what you want to download from TpT and teach!…easy, peasy, lemon squeezy!
Don’t forget to let the author know how much you appreciate their hard work in your feedback or blog comments so we are encouraged to keep the freebies flowing! 
           
    
   

 Happy Holidays!
💖Debora


Do you know about Number Sense and Subitizing?

Teach Magically Subitizing and Number Sense Dice Picture

Have you been working on building number sense?  Subitizing should be a focus!

What is subitizing?

Subtilizing is the ability to see a small amount of objects and know how many there are without counting. Subitizing is what tells you what number you roll on a six sided dice without counting the dots.  If your students have difficulty and always count the dots...you must practice until counting is no longer necessary! (Many will still have to count even if you do it every day!)

Roll a dice and try to tell the number without counting!  The students know that they can count, BUT only if needed!  

A Few FUN Things To Work on Number Sense

1. Color presents since it is December!  The sheet has the dots to match and the number to help with number recognition.  Download the free game by clicking on the picture!
Teach Magically Subitizing Number Sense Gift Picture

2. You can also play hopscotch! (Click here for FREE game.)Roll the dice, say the number, hop beside the number, turn around and hop back....yes, try to count backwards...if you can!
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER
Pin for Number Sense and Subitizing
3. Look for totals and the parts!
Teach Magically Number Sense Subitizing Gift Pictures
Take a look at the cards!  Find the total and discuss the parts (hopefully your kiddos will begin to see the parts just by recognizing the shape, subitizing. Discuss then finad a match on a recording sheet or write a number sentence! (Get Number Cards Here)

4. Dot Card Discussion. Talk about what is seen on dot cards! 
Christmas Dot Card Teach Magically
 Questions for discussion:
How many dots did you see?
How did you know how many?
How did you know that was _____?
How did you see it?
What did you see?
Did anyone see it a different way?

It is so important to not to comment on answers!  You are trying to understand the thought process that is happening in the students' heads!  It also develops students' understanding of how to explain what they are thinking!  Other may get a few ideas too!

Give the gift of number sense and subitize!

Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can get ideas to help children magically learn; plus it saves you time. 
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Make everyday magical,
💖Debora from Teach Magically





How do you teach beginning readers?


kid reading Teach Magically Teaching beginning readers

Teaching Beginning Readers

Research has proven that students who enter kindergarten not knowing their letters are at risk. So if they learn their letters easily, the risk can be diminished. 

Jan Richardson collected data on students who enter kindergarten knowing less than 40 letters and concluded that two instructional procedures have quickly taught letter names, letter sounds, and many concepts of print to students that did not know above 40 letters. They were daily letter tracing practice and small group guided reading guided reading.
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER
pin Teach Magically teaching beginning readers
She recommends that a helper works with a student each day to tracing an ABC book. The ABC book is designed to teach letter names (upper and lower case). 
She recommends that students say the name of the letter twice as they trace the letter in the ABC book because students with very limited letter knowledge are likely to become overwhelmed if asked to learn the letter name and letter sound at the same time (Lipson & Wixson, 2010, Successful Approaches to RTI ). 


So add the sounds later.

How do you teach letters and sounds?


I have found that using arrows and starting dot point to help kiddos trace has made all the difference.
Teach Magically Helping Beginning Readers B Bus Picture
If students know the name of the letter it will be easier for them to remember the sound of the letter since the sound for the letter is often embedded in the name of the letter  (Lipson & Wixson, 2010, Successful Approaches to RTI, p. 42).


HOW TO DO IT

Sitting next to the student, have them trace each upper and lowercase letter with their finger and identify the picture while saying the names (i.e. “A, a, apple. B, b, ball.”). It’s important for the student to use their pointer finger (not a pencil or marker) and trace from top to bottom because “the tactile experience is essential for building a memory trace,” says Richardson. 

If the student needs help tracing, only help with the letters that are necessary with the hand-over-hand method. 
Teach Magically Hand over Hand Helping Beginning Readers
If they can identify 10-40 letters, they will trace the whole book daily.
ADAPT-If a student knows less than 10 letters, just have them trace the letters in their name.

other fun things I do to Help

Other fun ways to work with other phonological awareness skills. Here are a few ideas:
These activities integrate a variety of skills including early print concepts (Click here for free concepts of print handout)phonemic awareness, phonics, visual memory, visual scanning, letter formation, directionality, and using picture clues; students learn that reading makes sense. 

Catching readers early means we can close the achievement gap and prevent many of them from experiencing difficulty learning to read. 


Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas to help children magically learn; plus it saves you time. 
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Make everyday magical,
Hugs,
💖Debora from Teach Magically


Phonological Awareness or Phonemic Awareness


"They know most letters and sounds, but are they ready to read?" is a question asked by many parents and teachers of beginning readers. The answer...
Maybe, not!
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER

The skills for phonological awareness skills must be mastered before the complex skill of reading can be achieved.

What is Phonological Awareness?

The ability to hear sounds that make up words in spoken language. It is the big umbrella for all the skills needed to read and write. Language can be broken down into its components:
Teach Magically umbrella of phonological awareness skills
  • sentences to words 
  • words to syllables
  • syllables to onset-rime 
  • onset-rime to phonemes

Phonological Awareness provides a strong foundation for early reading success. A systematic and cohesive approach to teaching phonological awareness can build confident readers who are less likely to struggle with decoding and spelling skills.Students with a strong phonemic awareness are much more likely to be successful readers.

This includes recognizing words that rhyme, deciding whether words begin or end with the same sounds, understanding that sounds can be manipulated to create new words, and separating words into their individual sounds.

Check out my page with many ideas to teach these skills!

To build a strong reading success, children need to master Phonological Awareness Skills, especially phonemic awareness! 

What is Phonemic Awareness?

Phonemic awareness is a subset of phonological awareness in which listeners are able to hear, identify and manipulate phonemes, the smallest units of sound that can differentiate meaning.
Separating the spoken word "cat" into three distinct phonemes, /k/, /a/, and /t/, requires phonemic awareness. So jump as you say each sound to make it more fun!
Research shows that the ability to segment or separate words into parts is the biggest predictor of reading success!(Stanovich, 1993).
Teach Magically Phonological Awareness segmenting
I use these  No Prep Sound (phoneme) Worksheets with BINGO dabbers...touch one square for each sound! Writing the letters for the sounds at the bottom builds phonics skills into this fun activity.
Remember Phonemic Awareness only uses the sounds! Check out how they are related at Phonemic Awareness, Rhyming and Phonics

Phonemic Awareness Worksheet TeachMagically
Of course, but be sure to attach the letter names after the students understand letter names! For students with difficulties learning, add the phonics at the next lesson.

Don't forget to practice phonological awareness skills! Students with a strong phonemic awareness are much more likely to be successful readers. Phonological and Phonemic Awareness provides a strong foundation for early reading success. A systematic and cohesive approach to teaching phonological awareness can build confident readers who are less likely to struggle with decoding and spelling skills.

Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas to help children magically learn; plus it save you time. Please connect  on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.
Make everyday magical,
💖Debora from Teach Magically

Reading Sight Words!

Kids reading Sight Word Books

Ever have a difficult time trying to get some students to read sight words, or words that can not be stretched and need to learned by memory or sight.
📌THIS IMAGE FOR LATER
TeachMagically Blog post about Sight Words

Many Activities for Sight Word Recognition

  • Drill Sandwiches- A perfect way to practice all new learning. You sandwich new words between known words and practice until fluent. 
Sight Words Stamped in red play-dough from Teach Magically
Word Finds from Teach Magically for sight words




And all of these things are fine to practice but in the actual teaching what can you do to help the students with these difficult words? After working with a research based intervention system and observing the students just beginning to learn to read words, I think I have come across a way to help the brain learn these words!

I hope it helps you when you are teaching!

If students make an error with one of these irregular words (words you can not say the sounds and blend them back to get a word).

1st-Tell them the word and have them repeat the word.
2nd-Have them spell the word aloud and tell the word they spelled.
3rd-Return to the word a second time and have the child try to read the word by spelling it in their head.

I created an instruction sheet to share with parents plus I use it with the students for progress monitoring and goal setting! Click on picture to get document!
Family letter to teach sight words from Teach Magically
Click to get Free Family Letter.

I am going to do this activity first with every "sight word" we are trying to learn that can not be stretched (sounded out) that is not on our rhyming word wall.

I use rhyming posters at the beginning of the year for rhyming word id. Check out how I teach words with rhymes to help with writing👉 Rhyming Posters to Teach Sight Words.

I am also going to start having my students do this as they are reading. When those mistakes are made we have many ways to try and solve them! Click here to see Emergent Readers.
Kids reading sight word books from Teach Magically


You can find a great resource to helps students learn by clicking the picture below! The students love to practice these words because of the fun dinos! The lightning clue helps the kiddo spell or sound out the words!
Dinosaur Sight Words Practice Teach Magically
Check out other games at Teach Magically Be sure to follow Teach Magically so you can check out new games and ideas to help children magically learn; plus it save you time!


Please connect  on FacebookInstagram, and Pinterest.


Make everyday magical,
❤Debora from Teach Magically